Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 101  Introduction to Psychology 3 Credits


This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 103  Freshman Seminar 3 Credits


The major objective is to better acclimate the beginning college student (freshman and transfer) to campus life through an emphasis on affective education and group interaction. Values clarification and self-identity are important course components. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 109  The Human Environment 3 Credits


An interdisciplinary course which explains the human impact, as social groups and individuals, on the natural environment. It explores the relationships and interconnectedness between natural processes and social, economic, cultural, technological, and political culture. Critical environmental issues are discussed. Meets Gen Ed Requirements - Social Science Perspectives. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 120  Psychology of Leadership for Emerging Leaders: Theory and Application 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Emerging Leaders Learning Community members only. This course is for Emerging Leaders Learning Community students only. This course allows students to begin to develop their own leadership styles. While receiving a grounding in historical and contemporary psychological theories on leadership, they will practice leadership through community service and assess themselves based on theories, assessment instruments, and behaviors. This is a service-learning course. Previous course PSYC 194 effective through Winter 2012. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 200  Educational Psychology 3 Credits


Required for teaching. Covers child and adolescent development; fundamentals of learning theory as applied to classroom situations, learning inhibition and academic non-achievement, personal-social adjustment, measuring and evaluating teaching-learning, creativity. Course may not be taken by Psychology majors for major credit effective Fall 1995. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 201  Child Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Covers growth, development and behavior of children. Physical, intellectual, social and emotional development and their interaction. Scientific method exemplified through the literature and intensive study of individual children. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 202  Adolescent Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Covers biological, psychological and social factors that shape the transition from childhood to adulthood: Normal and deviant patterns of development in morals, intellect, emotions and judgment; problems of adolescents with practical application to oneself and others. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 203  Introduction to Psychological Research 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. The course will introduce students to different methods of psychological research including survey, correlational and experimental methods. Introductory descriptive statistics and correlational analysis will be covered. Basic aspects of sound scientific writing, including conducting a literature search and writing a scientific manuscript following American Psychological Association guidelines, will be emphasized. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 220  Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203 or PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288. An introduction to basic statistical methods in the behavioral sciences. The course begins with a review of descriptive statistics. The main course emphasis will be on probability theory and inferential statistics and their application to psychological research. This includes such methods as z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and nonparametric statistics. Laboratory sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply concepts from class using computers, particularly statistical software packages. 4 hours lecture.

PSYC 224  Children's Rights and Child Advocacy 3 Credits


Explores the review and evaluation of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of young citizens (preschool through adolescence); the process and goals of advocacy; the community services available to and lacking for the optimum development to maturity of young citizens. Psychology, education, sociology, mental health, law enforcement, medicine are domains of study and investigation. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 225  Psychology of Adjustment 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Discusses individual and social adjustment; typical varieties of adjustive behavior illustrated by practical examples; factors which facilitate or impede people's adaptation to life situations such as work, marriage, disability, etc. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 227  Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Topics include: Behavior and attitudes influenced by basic sexuality; widening perspectives to aid in decision-making; developmental periods and sexual relationships; connections between psychological theory and sexual mores; genetic understandings. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 230  Environmental Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Covers the influence of the physical environment on the behavior of organisms: population growth and regulation; crowding; sensory experience, enrichment and deprivation; motivational force of environmental stimulation; adaptation to environment as a function of prolonged exposure; salutary effects of aesthetically pleasing stimulation. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 231  Psychology of Aggression 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. The root causes of violence in America will be examined through case studies, (the protest-movement of the 1960's, sexual and physical abuse, violent-criminal activity, etc.) and familiarization with biochemical, psychological and socio-cultural research into causes and effects of aggression and violence. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 235  Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Surveys, current practices and problems of exceptional children and youth. Explores the unique needs of individuals with handicaps that involve intellectual, sensory, motor, neurological, social and emotional origins. Utilizes analysis of case materials for theoretical and practical applications to the psychology of exceptionality. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 245  Hispanic/Latino Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Focuses on the personal, social, institutional and cultural forces that affect the psychology of Hispanic/Latino Americans. The course will cover issues such as the measurement of psychological functions, bilingualism, personal values and belief systems, the dynamics of the family and acculturation. A midterm and a final exam as well as a research paper will be required from students. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 246  Psychology of the Black Experience 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Covers the historical impact of scientific and institutional racism on the psychological study of blacks. Survey and critical analysis of traditional European approaches with non-traditional methods for comparison. Future development and advancement of a black psychology considered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 248  Psychology and Law 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Law and psychology share a common focus: the understanding, prediction and regulation of human behavior. Despite this commonality of interest, different emphasis on these elements and a different mandate have frequently hindered active communication and collaboration between the disciplines. The purpose of this course is to present the common ground of law and psychology, and show how they contribute to each other. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 265  Psychology of Women 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 268  Psychological Aspects of Aging 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Overview of later maturity and aging. Emphasis on psychological, physiological and sociological aspects. Aging and the cognitive process. Mental health, death, adjustment problems, needs, issues. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 288  Introduction to Cognitive Science 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101. An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288 and Philosophy PHIL 288. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 294  Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 or WRIT 105 or CMST 101 or HONP 100. This is a service learning course that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of leadership from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Students receive in depth information on historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership. They participate in assessments of their own leadership competencies and capabilities based on theory and research. They then learn to apply, assess, compare, and critically evaluate theory, research, and assessment tools through a multi-week project with a community partner in which they have a chance to observe and practice leadership. Students combine theory and practice through a series of critical reflections that result in students articulating their learnings about leadership, the practice of leadership in the civic environment, and themselves as leaders. This course is not recommended for students who successfully completed PSYC 120. Meets Gen Ed - Social Science Perspectives. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 300  The Teaching of Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301; Psychology majors only; departmental permission. Students in this course will simultaneously learn concepts in teaching psychology, and work with a Psychology professor who will mentor them as the student acts as a teacher's assistant. Students will engage in a critical examination of the teaching of psychology. The course will run as a seminar where issues of curriculum development, teaching techniques, and ethical aspects will be discussed based on journal articles. The work as an assistant includes anonymous record keeping, leading study groups and providing a brief lecture. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 301  Experimental Psychology 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203 and PSYC 220;or PSYC 220 and PSYC 288 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288. Introduction to laboratory methods of research in areas such as motivation, perception and learning. Emphasis is on design and execution of exploratory investigations. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Psychology. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

PSYC 302  Health Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. The theoretical, empirical and clinical aspects of health psychology will be presented. The relation of health psychology with other areas of psychology and other scientific disciplines will be discussed. The historical developments of the field, its research methodologies, theoretical models and exemplary interventions will be described. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 303  Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Application of psychological principles and practices in business and industry. Problems of communication, group dynamics, man-machine relations, employee attitudes, accident prevention, industrial job selection techniques, motivation, executive leadership. Commonly used selection tests will be evaluated. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 304  Social Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Focuses on social behavior of the individual and the group, social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes and values; development and dynamics of social groups; inter-group tension and prejudice; mass phenomena; psychological approaches to social issues. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 305  Physiological Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Anatomical, neural and biochemical bases of behavior are studied. Topics include localization of function, neuro-hormonal interaction, sensory and motor functioning, emotions, the relationship of neurophysiological processes and personality. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 306  Psychology Of Work: Personnel Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course will address psychological issues involved in personnel decision making (e.g., job interviewing decisions, hiring decisions). Students will learn about aligning organizational and human resource strategy, and learn about tools and techniques in personnel psychology including job analysis, equal employment opportunity law, performance management, employee selection, and organizational training and development. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about important personnel functions and then apply the knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will learn about measurement and assessment of job applicant and how this assessment must be conducted to be fair and successful. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 307  Psychology 0f Work: Organizational Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course will address individual, social and group interactions in work organizations. Students will learn about how social factors such as roles, norms, groups, stereotypes, and culture, influence individual and organizational behavior. Students will study theories and practices in organizations to assess and improve job attitudes, work stress, work motivation, leadership, and organizational functioning. This course is designed to be an active learning course where students learn about the different social factors that influence organizational function, and then apply this knowledge in activities and assessments. Students will gain a better understanding of their own work experiences as a result of this course. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 308  Perception 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Discusses the theory and procedure of perceptual research. Theoretical approaches; modern psychophysical and perceptual research; traditional problems of perception, constancies of size and color brightness. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 310  Introduction to Psychological Testing 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement and personality; principles of psychological testing; approaches to test construction. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 313  Cognition 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. The study of the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge, utilizing behavioral, observational, and computer modeling methods. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 314  Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course examines how human beings make decisions and judgments. It reviews how personal values, uncertainty and cognitive, social, and neurological processes affect decision making. This course draws upon a wide range of examples from many fields including psychology, economics, criminology, and medicine. Students will also learn strategies and techniques to enhance judgment. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 320  Developmental Psychology I 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course surveys human psychological development from the prenatal period to adolescence. The interacting forces of heredity, environment and physical, cognitive, emotional and socio-cultural factors are reviewed in the light of current research and theory in these areas. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 324  Contemporary Issues in Child Advocacy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior Psychology or Justice Studies majors only. An in-depth study of current topics in the field of child advocacy. The impact of Megan's Law, advocacy for adopted children, child right-to-life movement, and repressed memory syndrome are among the possible issues to be explored. A multi-disciplinary focus will be used to enhance student understanding and learning. Previous course PSYC 430 effective through Spring 2013. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 330  Forensic Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203 or JUST 300 or LAWS 302. An examination of the interaction between psychology and the legal system. Emphasis placed on the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathic behavior, court-mandated evaluations and the role of the psychologist as expert witness. The application of psychological knowledge within the criminal justice context. Ethical guidelines in forensic psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 332  Psychological Foundations of Personality 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Explores current approaches and theories of personality development and organization. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 340  Human Learning and Memory 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Covers research, language and methods of learning theory. Classical and operant conditioning, complex habits, remembering and forgetting, transfer of training, cognition and behavior modification. Review of animal research but primary emphasis is on people. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 348  Psycholinguistics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Explores the study of language through linguistic, behavioral, and cognitive methods. Basic linguistic ideas are used for the explication of problems in grammar, cognitive structure, meaning, and speech production and comprehension. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 353  Comparative Animal Behavior 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. The student will explore experimental and field studies of behavior in a few selected animal species with particular reference to the behavior of vertebrates. The course will involve detailed study of instinctive behavior and imprinting, respondent and operant behavior with emphasis upon the procedures and variables concerned with the acquisition of new forms of behavior. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 354  Clinical Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course will provide an understanding of the basic tenets of the field of clinical psychology. The relation of clinical psychology with other areas of psychology and other disciplines will be discussed. The course will cover clinical psychology's past and present, assessment and intervention, approaches to practicing clinical psychology, multicultural issues in clinical psychology, and the future of the field. Fulfills Category "4 Social/Applied" in Advanced Elective list. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 355  Motivation 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. The concepts of instincts, homeostasis, drive, reinforcement, arousal and inception are analyzed with reference to data drawn from many areas of experimentation. The primary emphasis is on the experimental, rather than the theoretical literature: motivational concepts relevant to human and animal research. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 358  Fundamentals of Conditioning and Learning 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Major theoretical problems and theories of learning are considered. Includes experimental analysis of basic phenomena of conditioning and learning, studied primarily through experimental studies of infra-human organisms. Students may study selected topics more extensively. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 360  History and Systems of Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Discusses the historical development of psychology, comparative analysis of the major schools of contemporary psychology, and new trends and movements in psychological theory. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 365  Abnormal Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. Topics include an overview of psychopathological processes: neuroses, psychoses, and characterological disorders; feeling, thinking and behavioral aspects during the life span; diagnostic and treatment procedures. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 366  Health Psychology: Applications to the Community 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. The course will present psychological contributions to interventions designed to promote health, prevent illness and avert further disability. Appropriate techniques to assess, plan, and implement programs at the community level will be discussed. The multidisciplinary, multilevel nature of community programs will be emphasized. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 375  Evolutionary Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 203. This course examines behavior from a Darwinian perspective attempting to understand how our behaviors have evolved throughout time. By examining behavior in terms of natural selection, this course provides a new and insightful perspective to all areas of psychology, including cognitive, social, developmental, and neuropsychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 393  School Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC101 and PSYC203. This course provides an introduction to the practice and profession of school psychology. Topics include the history of the profession, multicultural foundations, training and credentialing, and contemporary issues in the field. Students also explore the various roles and functions of school psychologists, including assessment, consultation, intervention, and systems-level programming. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 402  Systems of Psychotherapy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 354 or PSYC 365 or departmental approval. An overview of classical and contemporary systems of psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on understanding each system in terms of its underlying theory of personality, psychopathology and therapeutic impact. Studies of therapeutic efficacy are also covered. Other issues include such topics as the training of psychotherapists and the ethical issues involved in psychotherapy. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 405  Psychological Anthropology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 or ANTH 100; PSYC 301 must be taken by Psychology majors. Transcultural focus on the inter-related nature of culture and human behavior. Team taught interdisciplinary course with emphasis on mutual dependencies of psychological and anthropological theory and method. Students work with bicultural informants. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 405. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 420  Packaged Computer Programs for Psychology 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. A detailed review on the use of a computer package for the purpose of doing statistical analyses of psychological data. The instructor will select one such package for presentation and choose among SSPS, EcStatic, BMD, SAS, and others. Instruction will be provided on coding, data entry, menu selection, score transformation, and exporting. 1 hour lecture.

PSYC 459  Special Topics in Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301. An in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in a specific area of psychology. The area to be covered is chosen by the instructor. The course permits the instructor and students to examine psychological issues which are either not covered in the curriculum or which deserve more in-depth treatment than is possible in a regular course. The course may be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as part of major degree requirements in psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 483  Advanced Research Seminar 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. In this course, students will develop advanced understanding and experiential skills in a topic area of experimental psychology including the ethics, design, planning, execution, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of original psychological research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 488  Seminar in Cognitive Science 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): LNGN 300 or CMPT 288 or LNGN 288 or PHIL 288 or PSYC 288. Seminar discussion of foundation works and contemporary research articles in Cognitive Science. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of Cognitive Science for comprehensive in-depth review of research and write a literature review. Professional issues in Cognitive Science are discussed. Cross listed with Linguistics LNGN 488. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 491  Independent Study I: Research 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department.

PSYC 492  Independent Study II: Research 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Individual research project under supervision of a professor in the department.

PSYC 495  Psychology Honors I 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301; departmental approval; overall GPA of 3.5. With the instructor's guidance and supervision, each student will define an area of psychology for a comprehensive, in-depth review of research; generate research questions and hypotheses; delineate appropriate design, methodology and statistical analyses to answer these questions and test these hypotheses; collect and analyze preliminary data; and write an Honors Thesis Proposal. 4 hours lecture.

PSYC 496  Psychology Honors II 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Completion of PSYC 495 with a grade of A or A-. This course constitutes the second semester of Psychology Honors. Students are expected to gather, analyze and interpret the data for their honors project, write the analysis and discussion chapters, and submit their completed honors thesis. Students who successfully complete this course will graduate with honors in psychology. 4 hours lecture.

PSYC 504  Cognitive Psychology 3 Credits


This course provides students with in-depth exposure to classic and contemporary theories and research in cognition. Specific topics covered include neuroscience, attention, perception, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning and decision-making, and natural and artificial intelligence. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 506  Multicultural Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course is designed to expose students to multicultural issues which are central to theory, practice, and research. The course focuses on awareness, knowledge, and skills. Awareness is centered on understanding multiple value systems and worldviews and gaining insight into one's own cultural socialization and inherent biases. Knowledge focuses on acquiring accurate understanding of various cultural groups. Skills relate to specific culturally appropriate and tailored interventions. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 510  Research Methods in Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course addresses skills needed to read, understand and critically evaluate research reports. Students also learn how to carry out the entire research process, beginning with identifying the research problem and ending with a thesis or research report. Factorial analysis of variance and the major multiple correlational designs are explained. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 520  Human Experimental Psychology 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 510. Students survey methods and topics in human experimental psychology by conducting, analyzing, and reporting on experiments on topics to be drawn from cognition, memory, language, perception, learning, sensation, and neuropsychology. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

PSYC 546  Data Science for Social Scientists 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 550 (or comparable course) with a B or higher and a minimum GPA of 3.0 or by Department/Instructor approval. Exceptions will be made for students demonstrating exemplary talent (e.g., honors, involvement, challenging coursework). Proficiency with introductory statistics recommended (e.g., ANOVA, regression). Preference for those pursuing advanced education, applied research, or working a faculty lab. This course is an intermediate introduction to data analytics for social scientists using open-source statistical and graphical programming language (e.g., R, Python) to capture, visualize, analyze, and, ultimately, create rich insights about human behavior. The course is broken into three sections: (i) fundamentals of programming (e.g., R, Python), including data types, functions, importing, anipulation, and database fundamentals; (ii) psychological statistics, including visualization, ANOVA, regression, conditional process modeling, and path analysis; and (iii) data science tools, including generating reports and web apps, web scraping, machine learning, and natural language processing. No programming experience required. Ideal for students pursuing an advanced education, career in applied data analysis, or interested in statistical reasoning about human behavior. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 550  Quantitative and Statistical Methods 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course presents the theory and use of simple and factorial ANOVA, regression, and covariance to analyze representative psychological data. The use of computer packages for analysis is included. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 551  Latina/o Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines the personal, familial, social, cultural and institutional forces that affect the psychology of Latina/os and explores how these factors impact assessment and treatment. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 552  Social Psychology 3 Credits


This course surveys and analyzes the theoretical and empirical literature of modern social psychology. Among topics covered are the history of social psychology, attitude development and change, aggression, helping behavior, social perception, stereotyping and prejudice, social influence, and a number of other themes and issues focused on the individual's relationship to the larger social structure. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 559  Personnel Selection: Issues and Procedures 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course addresses statistical, conceptual, and legal issues in organizational selection processes. Students learn about the role of individual differences, job performance, and job analysis in formulating and validating predictive hypotheses of employee success. Other topics include the consideration of applicant attitudes, discrimination, and utility in judging the success of selection systems, as well as methods of employee assessment and how these assessments must be conducted in order to be fair and successful. Students complete applied projects that require statistical analyses and gaining access to an organization to collect information necessary to develop selection procedures for a particular position. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 560  Advanced Educational Psychology 3 Credits


A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive, and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences, including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children, and other topics. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 561  Developmental Psychology 3 Credits


Philosophical, conceptual, theoretical, and research issues pertinent to human development from prenatal life to adulthood are presented. Core conceptual issues of development, such as the nature-nurture controversy, the continuity-discontinuity issue, and the issue of stability-instability, are discussed, and their relationships to major theories in developmental psychology are examined. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 563  Theories of Learning 3 Credits


The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of modern learning theory, its historical context, theoretical ideas, research, and applications. To this end, the theoretical ideas of the major schools of learning--behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, and information-processing--are reviewed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 565  Developmental Psychopathology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. This course covers the development and diagnosis of psychological disorders, including mood, anxiety, disruptive behavior, substance use, and autism spectrum disorders. Students learn the developmental psychopathology framework and explore the characteristics, course, and etiology of psychological disorders. Emphasis is placed on examining relationships between cognitive, biological, social, and other factors which influence the developmental origins and consequences of emotional and behavioral problems, particularly in childhood and adolescence. This course also addresses issues associated with assessment, classification, and diagnosis, and students are expected to learn diagnostic categories and criteria from the most recent edition of the DSM. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 566  Interventions for Effective Organizations 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course examines interventions based on psychological principles that are used to enhance individual and organizational effectiveness. Common interventions covered include training and development programs, executive coaching, leader and leadership development, talent management, organizational design, and innovation processes. Knowledge and skills important to developing these interventions and facilitating them in applied settings are developed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 568  Psychology of Group Dynamics 3 Credits


This course presents theories of group dynamics and illustrative application to understand personal, marital, political, industrial, and professional life. Personal participation by the student in a group interactive process is required. The course is designed especially to help group leaders understand the complex underlying dynamic forces that influence our behavior in groups. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 569  Group Theory and Development in Organizations 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theory and research on work groups with more practical applications of development and assessment of these groups. Students learn about factors that can facilitate and inhibit the development and effectiveness of successful work groups. Students learn various models of group development and team process, as well as different ways of assessing team effectiveness. Students are engaged in team projects throughout the semester to learn how working in groups and teams differs from working alone and working in a more traditionally hierarchical fashion. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 570  Leadership: Theory and Development 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theories, research, and practice in leadership and leadership development. Students learn historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership and how their own (and others) personal views about leadership influence what they perceive as leadership. Students also learn how to develop leaders and leadership in organizations as suggested by various theories. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 571  Organizational Psychology 3 Credits


This course examines the psychological aspects of organizational behavior. Emphasis is placed on the organization effected by individual psychological processes and behavior. Areas covered include social norms, group and team processes, leadership and power, motivation, job attitudes and satisfaction, and organizational change. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 573  Behavioral Neuroscience 3 Credits


This course addresses the physiological bases of normal and abnormal behavior, with emphasis on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the human nervous system. Beginning with the nerve cell, the course progresses through the receptors, spinal cord, cortical and subcortical structures, psychosurgery, biofeedback, and other topics. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 574  Cognitive Assessment 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Students learn how to administer, score, and interpret individual intelligence tests, including the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. Intelligence tests for use with children and adolescents, such as the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, are covered. Theories of intelligence and the appropriateness of the tests to specific populations are discussed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 575  Clinical Assessment 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Special fee. This course addresses the theory and practice of clinical assessment. Students learn various methods for assessing social, emotional, and behavioral problems, including unstructured and structured interviews, surveys, and rating scales. Students gain knowledge and skills of interviewing and report writing needed to engage clients, with emphasis on strategies for interviewing children, adolescents, and families. Instruments are reviewed from the standpoints of basic research and the mechanics of administration and scoring. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 577  Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment I 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist programs. This course represents the first in a series of two 1-credit semester supervised practicum experiences in psychoeducational assessment at MSU's on-campus assessment clinic. Students are involved in planning and administration of psychoeducational evaluations of clients, as well as scoring and interpretation. Students also participate in feedback sessions with clients and families.

PSYC 578  Psychometrics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course surveys the theory, construction, and application of psychological tests. Topics include the statistical concepts underlying measurement, reliability and validity, critical analyses of selected tests, and evaluation and interpretation of test data in practical situations. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 579  Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment II 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist programs. This course is the second in a series of two 1-credit semester supervised practicum experiences in psychoeducational assessment at MSU's on-campus assessment clinic. Students are involved in planning and administration of psychoeducational evaluations of clients, as well as scoring and interpretation. Students also participate in feedback sessions with clients and families.

PSYC 582  Behavior Modification 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist programs. This course reviews applications of conditioning principles to changing human behavior in clinical, educational, occupational, and community settings. Selected topics include operant and classical conditioning, social learning theory, token economies, experimental design, cognitive behavior modification, aversive control, cognitive restructuring, biofeedback, and ethical issues in behavior modification. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 583  Sensation and Perception 3 Credits


This course addresses a range of visual processing phenomena, from sensory processing to memory and thinking. Topics covered include psychophysics, the physiological bases of vision, involvement of cognitive processes in perception, perceptual development, and psychoaesthetics. The course also examines hearing, the skin senses, smell, and taste. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 584  Performance Management 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course addresses how we motivate and manage individual and group performance in organizations through performance management systems. Students learn about how performance is managed, methods of collecting performance feedback, using performance management for evaluation and development purposes, and biases and consistency issues in performance appraisals. This course also covers criterion measurement and development, the use of motivational theory in performance management, sources of performance feedback, and communicating performance feedback. Students are responsible for gaining entrance into an organization and collecting the information necessary to develop a performance management system for that organization. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 585  Work Attitudes and Motivation: Theory and Application 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theory on work attitudes and motivation with more practical applications of developing strategies to help today's diverse population of employees become satisfied and motivated in their work settings. Students learn historical and contemporary theories of job satisfaction, stress, and motivation, assessment of these constructs, and strategies for improving satisfaction and motivation, such as goal setting, job design, incentive systems, and participation in decision making. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 592  Health Psychology 3 Credits


This course explores the theoretical, empirical, and clinical aspects of health psychology. Discussion focuses on the relation of health psychology to other areas of psychology and various scientific disciplines. Students learn about the field’s historical development, research methodologies, theoretical models, and evidence-based interventions. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 593  Clinical Interviewing 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course integrates the theory and practice of clinical interviewing. The goals of this course are to facilitate the development of the student's listening, diagnostic, and therapeutic interviewing skills. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 594  School-Based Interventions 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course focuses on theory, research, and implementation of school-based psychosocial interventions for children, adolescents, and their families. Students learn interviewing and treatment strategies to address various childhood problems (e.g., depression, anxiety, trauma, bullying) in the context of school and classroom settings. Issues and challenges involved in implementing interventions in schools are discussed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 601  Behavioral Assessment and Intervention 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course provides training in techniques of behavioral assessment, including direct observation, interviews, checklists, and rating scales. Assessment is considered from an empirically-based, problem-solving model, in which students learn to select assessment tools appropriate to referral questions. Students complete a functional behavioral assessment and develop a behavior intervention plan through a supervised experience in a school setting. 3 hour lecture.

PSYC 602  Introduction to Forensic Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. The objective of this course is to broadly expose students to the discipline of forensic psychology and provide an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the psychologist working within the justice system. This course introduces students to major topics and issues in forensic psychology and is divided into two sections. The first section examines forensic psychology as it relates to clinical prediction, assessment, and treatment in the civil and criminal justice systems. The second section focuses on experimental forensic psychology, orienting students to non-clinical issues faced by psychologists operating in these arenas. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 611  Internship in Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course serves as a capstone experience where students work in an applied setting and receive close and ongoing supervision by both a faculty member and a practitioner with a graduate I/O (or related) degree working in industry. Students are expected to review theory and research relevant to the field of I/O, develop individual project proposals for the investigation of a problem in their applied setting, implement their proposals after approval by their faculty member, and report their completed work in both a written and an oral report for the M.A. degree. Must be taken twice in consecutive semesters for a total of 6.0 credits.

PSYC 613  Research Methods in Forensic Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course introduces students to methods and techniques used to generate empirical research within the discipline of forensic psychology. Emphasis is placed on experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Students are introduced to the major data analytic strategies used in psychology research, as well as the ethical and legal challenges inherent in forensic psychology research. This course enables students to be educated consumers of the forensic psychological literature and to evaluate the merits of such research for its integration into forensic practice. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 620  Forensic Psychology in Criminal Proceedings 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. An examination of substantive criminal law in the United States, with emphasis on analysis of the justification of punishment, definition of offenses, Constitutional limits, significance of resulting harm, group criminality, and methods of exculpation or defense that impact the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 622  Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. Children in the last few decades have been given special recognition and increased protection under state, federal, and international law. However, doctrines and beliefs developed in periods when the social value of children was low, as well as when the legal duties of parents and the state were minimal, continue to influence the way the law views children. This course surveys various areas of the law concerning children and examines their sources and influences. Topics covered include responsibilities of the state and family in the care of the child, including education, legal treatment of abused and neglected children, rules concerning the medical treatment of children, adoption, surrogacy and parentage, treatment of children accused of crimes in the juvenile justice system, children's disabilities, and government entitlement programs for children. This course also examines the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, a treaty that seeks to render universal certain rules respecting the treatment of children. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 626  Expert Testimony 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. A study of the law and rules (with particular attention given to the Federal Rules of Evidence) governing the proof of disputed issues of fact in criminal and civil trials, including the functions of judge and jury; relevancy; real and demonstrative evidence; authentication and production of writings; the examination, competency, and privileges of witnesses; hearsay; impeachment; and burden of proof, presumptions, and judicial notice in the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 650  Theories of Interpersonal and Familial Violence 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines the psychological, criminological, and sociobiological theories of interpersonal and familial violence, as well as the psychological disorders commonly encountered in the context of individuals who may be perpetrators or victims of violence. This course spans topics related to both criminal and family court evaluations and involves review, critical evaluation, and integration of current scientific literature regarding diagnoses, phenomenology, and etiology of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, sexual violence, homicide, domestic violence, and child abuse and neglect. This course also explores relevant state and federal statute and case law regulating mental health professional practice. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 658  Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course covers the most recent advances, issues, and problems in Industrial and Organizational Psychology through relevant professional journals, technical literature, legislation and judicial decisions, advanced research techniques, and consulting practice in order to prepare students for continued education or applied practice of the field. Students critique professional journals and review the development of topics in the field. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 659  Special Topics Seminar in Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course provides an in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in various areas of psychology. It is designed to permit faculty with particular interests and expertise to provide students with a comprehensive analysis of a selected contemporary issue (or issues) in psychology. May be repeated two times for a maximum of 9 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 661  Introduction to School Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course provides an introduction the profession and practice of school psychology. Topics include the history and foundations of school psychology, roles and functions of school psychologists, professional issues and standards, and contemporary issues and anticipated future directions in the field. Students also participate in a practicum experience, in which they learn about the roles, skills, and credentials required of school psychologists by directly observing a school psychologist employed in a K-12 school setting.

PSYC 662  Externship in School Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. Students serve as apprentice psychologists in cooperating school districts. A certified school psychologist, employed in the cooperating district, serves as the student's on-site supervisor. Students meet weekly with the faculty instructor for additional supervision.

PSYC 663  Independent Study 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. The student conducts an individual project under the supervision of a professor in the department. May be taken only once for a maximum of 3.0 credits.

PSYC 664  Criminal Forensic Assessment 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines issues related to conducting assessments for the criminal courts. Students review and critique case law and current psycho-legal research as they pertain to forensic assessment and are exposed to current, empirically supported practices in forensic assessment in several domains, including, but not limited to, violence risk, adjudicative competency, mitigation and criminal responsibility, and specific issues related to the assessment of youth charged in criminal court. Emphasis is placed on preparing written reports for the criminal courts and ethical issues often experienced in criminal forensic settings. Students learn how to administer commonly used Forensic Assessment Instruments (FAIs) and how to integrate FAI data and other testing data into assessment reports. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 665  Child and Family Forensic Assessment 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines issues related to conducting assessments concerning children and families for the civil courts. Students review and critique current research in forensic psychology pertaining to child and family forensic assessment, as well as developing case law, such as family law in divorce and dissolution. Current assessment practices, including the use of objective and projective (including actuarial) measures, is taught. Emphasis is placed on constructing written reports and ethical issues often experienced in forensic settings related to children and families. This course also addresses forensic mental health areas involving children and families, such as child abuse and neglect (including medical neglect), risk and safety (including domestic violence), custody and parenting time, and termination of parental rights. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 667  Lifespan Psychopathology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational, or School Psychologist programs. This course focuses on theoretical models and selected research in psychopathology across the lifespan. Students are expected to learn diagnostic categories and criteria from the most recent edition of the DSM, including anxiety and mood disorders, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and somatic symptom disorders. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 668  Consultation Methods in Psychoeducational Settings 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines the theory and practice of consultation in psychoeducational settings. Students learn a collaborative, problem-solving model of consultation and about intrapersonal, interpersonal, and systemic factors associated with successful consultation. As part of the course, students serve as a consultant to a teacher under direct supervision and monitoring. Cross listed with Curriculum and Teaching, SPED 668. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour other.

PSYC 670  Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions I 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc program. This course provides an overview of the theory, research, and practice of evidence-based psychotherapy. In addition to emphasizing the development of the student’s basic therapeutic and counseling skills, this course focuses largely on psychological interventions for anxiety, mood, and other emotional disorders, including intervention strategies for children and adolescents. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 671  Interventions in Forensic Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course reviews treatment concepts, techniques, and programs for youths and adults involved with the legal system, in both criminal justice and family/child protection domains. In the criminal justice domain, the course addresses evidence‐based cognitive behavioral and multimodal treatments for justice-involved individuals, including those that target risk factors for reoffending, subtypes of justice‐involved persons, and common non‐criminogenic needs among correctional populations. Attention is also paid to assessment and multicultural issues in correctional psychology. In the family and child protection domain, topics include interventions that focus on issues concerning parents or caregivers, as well as interventions that emphasize the family. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 678  Ethics and Professional Issues in Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. This course provides a survey of ethical and professional issues in psychology practice, teaching, and research. Through readings, discussions, and case analyses, this course aims to provide students familiarity with the Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (APA) and skills for ethical decision making and resolution of ethical dilemmas in psychology. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 679  Family Systems and Therapy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines theoretical approaches to family systems and therapy. Students learn family-based approaches to common internalizing and externalizing disorders of childhood and adolescence, including anxiety, mood, substance use, and disruptive behavior disorders. This course also covers issues of family functioning that have special relevance for the development of emotional and behavioral problems, including trauma, maltreatment, domestic violence, divorce, and parental psychopathology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 680  Externship in Clinical Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Students complete a supervised clinical experience in a mental health setting, such as a hospital, community mental health center, or school. Depending on their placements, students may provide supervised intake interviews, psychological assessments, and individual, group, and family therapy. On-site supervision takes place under the direction of a licensed mental health professional, in cooperation with the Director of Clinical Training and program directors at Montclair State. Students also meet with a Montclair State faculty supervisor on a weekly basis. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

PSYC 698  Master's Thesis 4 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take PSYC 699 if they don't complete PSYC 698 within the semester.

PSYC 699  Master's Thesis Extension 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 698. Continuation of Master's Thesis Project. Thesis Extension will be graded as IP (in Progress) until thesis is completed, at which time a grade of Pass or Fail will be given.

PSYC 701  Trauma-Related Disorders and Treatments 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology Permission of the instructor. In this course, students will learn about the nature and prevalence of exposure to potentially traumatic events and trauma-related disorders, including Acute Stress Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Reactive Attachment Disorder. Biological, developmental, psychological, and sociocultural contributions to the onset and persistence of trauma-related symptoms will be discussed. Finally, the course will provide an overview of empirically supported treatments for trauma-related disorders, among them Cognitive Processing Therapy, Prolonged Exposure Therapy, and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 702  Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions II 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology Graduate Programs, PSYC 670, or permission of instructor. This course provides an introduction to the theory, research, and practice of evidence-based psychotherapy. It is the second course in a two-course sequence, following Evidence-Based Interventions I. In addition to continued development of the student’s basic therapeutic and counseling skills, this course will focus largely on psychological interventions for disruptive behavior, impulse control, substance use, addictive, and eating disorders. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 709  Seminar in Clinical Child Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology, Permission of instructor. This course provides an in-depth survey of important theoretical and methodological issues within clinical child psychology. It is designed to allow faculty with particular interests and expertise in clinical child psychology to provide breadth and depth of exposure to a selected contemporary topic (or topics) in the field, such as pediatric psychology, early childhood mental health, and dissemination and implementation science.. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 711  Program Planning and Evaluation in Applied Settings 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 550, PSYC 510 and Advanced standing in Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program with Specialization in school Psychology or departmental approval. The course is designed to develop knowledge, skills, and abilities that contribute to effective planning and evaluation of human services and educational programs that add value to individuals and groups in organizations and related community settings. Students will utilize four phases that constitute the program planning and evaluation process: clarifying the target population to be served, their human service needs, and the relevant context; designing a program that addresses important needs of the target population; implementing the program, making adjustments as indicated; and evaluating the merit of the program. Students will learn to apply principles of research design relative to qualitative and quantitative data collection procedures and identify strategies to analyze and present data in a meaningful and understandable way to key stakeholders in order to make informed programmatic decisions. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 725  Psychological Science and the Law 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Clinical Ph.D Program with Specialization in Forensics, Psych and Law, or permission of the instructor. This seminar is designed to expose the student to classic and contemporary issues in psychology and law. The course will examine research in a variety of areas in which psychology intersects with the legal system, including areas such as procedural justice, eyewitness identifications, jury decision-making, plea bargains and interrogation. The focus will be on both basic and applied issues raised by the readings. How has the research advanced relevant psychological theory and what are the implications for future research? To what extent does or should the research inform public policy? We will discuss basic psychological theory, relevant case law, and methodological issues associated with conducting research in psychology and law. Issues related to social science evidence, including expert testimony of clinical psychologists, will be also addressed. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 739  Multivariate Statistics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Graduate Psychology Programs and PSYC 550, or departmental approval. This course provides a survey of multivariate statistical techniques that are typically used in psychological research. Topics covered include but are not limited to multiple regression, logistic regression, factor analysis, and methods for handling missing data. The course includes lecture and laboratory components. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 740  Theory Building and Model Testing 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Graduate Psychology Programs and PSYC 550, or departmental approval. This course explores advanced and specialized topics in psychological research methods. It aims to familiarize students with the nature of psychological theory and causal claims, application of structural equation modeling, and methodological pitfalls in power, measurement, and replication. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 745  History and Systems of Psychology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Graduate Psychology Programs or departmental approval. This course provides students with foundational knowledge and skills in studying the history of modern psychology. Topics include the philosophical underpinnings of modern psychology, the emergence of theory and research in Europe and America, and the various innovations that led to the development of clinical, school, and forensic psychology, respectively. Students also will explore psychology’s historical social agenda and consider its impact on contemporary social issues and practice. May be repeated for a maximum number of six credits. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 895  Pre-Doctoral Internship I 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Permission of Doctoral Program Director. Students in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology are required to complete a pre-doctoral internship, which is comprised of an advanced, one-year full-time placement in a clinical setting determined by the Doctoral Program Director and the student. Students complete PSYC 895 in the Fall semester, followed by PSYC 896 in the Spring semester.

PSYC 896  Pre-Doctoral Internship II 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 895 and matriculation in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Permission of Doctoral Program Director. Students in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology are required to complete a pre-doctoral internship, which is comprised of an advanced, one-year full-time placement in a clinical setting determined by the Doctoral Program Director and the student. Students complete PSYC 895 in the Fall semester, followed by PSYC 896 in the Spring semester.

PSYC 900  Dissertation Advisement 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Permission of Graduate Advisor required. This department requires 12 credits of PSYC 900. While enrolled in PSYC 900, students will work with their Dissertation Chair and their Dissertation Committee. Credits are reported as IP (In Progress) while the dissertation is being written. At the conclusion of the dissertation defense, a final grade of Pass or Fail will be recorded.

PSYC 901  Dissertation Extension 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): 12 credits of PSYC 900, Dissertation Advisement. Matriculation in the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Permission of Graduate Advisor required. Once students have acquired 12 credits of PSYC 900, Dissertation Advisement, they must enroll in 1 credit of PSYC 901 in every semester in which they intend to work on the dissertation, up to and including the semester of the defense. Credits are reported as IP (In Progress) while the dissertation is being written. At the conclusion of the dissertation defense, a final grade of Pass or Fail will be recorded. PSYC 901 may be repeated until the time limitation for completion of the doctoral program, as specified in the Doctoral Policy Manual, has been reached.