Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 100  Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits


The nature, scope, methods, basic problems and major types of philosophy. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 102  Ethics 3 Credits


The nature of ethical judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, the conditions of moral responsibility and the methodological presuppositions of ethical theories in philosophy and religion. Meets the 2002 General Education Requirement - Humanities, Philolosphy/Religion. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 106  Logic 3 Credits


The forms of deductive and inductive argument in traditional logic, the fundamentals of modern formal logic. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 200  History of Ethics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. A historical survey of major ethical theories in the Western philosophical tradition, from ancient times to the present. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 202  Ethics and Business 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. A study of the meaning of morality in the modern world of business. Course contains balance of theory and practice as it examines behavior of business against background of conflicting ethical theory. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 204  Philosophical Issues in Biomedical Ethics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. A study of moral decision making in regard to specific moral problems arising in such areas of contemporary medical research and practice as experimentation on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, information rights of patients, and eugenic sterilization. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 206  Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. An examination of philosophical approaches to current issues related to law and justice. Close attention will be paid to one or more of the following specific issues: freedom of religion, freedom of expression, gay rights, reproductive rights, or civil disobedience and political protest. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 208  Ethical Issues in Education 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. This course focuses on current ethical issues in education, such as academic integrity, censorship, speech and dress codes, racial and gender equity, same-sex education, religious expression, and school violence. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 212  Social and Political Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The nature of society and the state, their relation to each other and to the individual, and an evaluation of some main political and social ideals. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 214  Ethics of Love, Sex and Desire 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. An exploration of the ethical issues related to human sexuality and/or intimate relationships. The focus in this course is on conflicts and/or problem areas related to love, sex and desire and the ways ethicists address them. Ethical issues to be discussed include: monogamy, promiscuity, gay marriage, abstinence education, transgender identity, pornography, prostitution, and sexual abuse. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 231  American Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The major American philosophers and philosophical movements with emphasis on Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 233  Contemporary Philosophers 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The major movements in contemporary philosophy, studied through writings of leading exponents. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 237  Asian Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. This course introduces students to the major movements and thinkers in Asian philosophy. It acquaints students with Asian philosophical interpretations of experience and reality found in both classical and contemporary Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism in Eastern cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Offered as PHIL 137 through Winter 2013. To become PHIL 237 effective Spring 2013. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 239  Existentialism 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The major themes and concepts of existentialism in selected writings of the existentialist philosophers. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 260  Philosophies of Art 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The major philosophies of art in the history of Western thought. The conceptual network of ideas of the thinker in question will be delineated, and connections shown between the thinker and the philosophical and artistic themes of that period. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 262  Philosophy of Religion 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The nature and shape of religious experience, criteria for meaning within religious thought and language; metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of god, and the possibility of life after death. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 264  Critical Reasoning and Arguments 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. An intermediary level course concentrating upon argumentation and rhetorical devices as they actually function in everyday conversation, philosophical discussion, forensic debate, etc. Arguments will be examined with an eye to penetrating purely formal structure and discovering the underlying dynamics which contribute to cogency in a given context. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 266  Philosophy of Science 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. The epistemological character of scientific thought and the relevance of scientific findings for the clarification and eventual resolution of traditional philosophical issues. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 270  Philosophy of Mind 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Philosophical issues arising from the study of mental processes including the relation of a person to the body, life after death, and the possible reduction of consciousness to a brain process. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 271  Philosophy of Sport 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Survey of the philosophical aspects of sport along with development of philosophical ideas about sport from the origins of competitive sport to the present. Special attention will be paid to such classic issues as the ontological status of games, sport as moral education, and athletics as substitutes for war. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 280  Philosophy of Cyberspace 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Contemporary and classical philosophical and ethical issues as applied to computer-mediated communication. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 288  Introduction to Cognitive Science 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): ANTH 100 or CSIT 111 or LNGN 210 or PHIL 100 or PSYC 101. An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of cognitive science. Topics include: the mind-body problem, thought as computation and the computer model of the mind, the role of representation in mental activity. Emphasis will be upon the methodological approaches found in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, cognitive anthropology, cognitive neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy. Cross listed with Computer Science CMPT 288, Linguistics LNGN 288, Psychology PSYC 288. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 290  Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 291  Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 292  Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 293  Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 295  Periods and Movements: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 297  Periods and Movements: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 310  Knowledge, Belief and Truth 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. The major issues and theories concerning the relationship between knowledge, experience and reality. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 312  Existence and Reality 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. An examination of major philosophical theories concerning the nature of reality. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 316  Philosophy of Law 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. An introduction to the philosophical issues of jurisprudence. Close attention is given to the status and nature of law, the concept of equality and the limits of law. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 322  Ideals of Peace 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. This course introduces students to the pacifist tradition in philosophy and religion, from its origins as a set of religious and philosophical ideals, to its current multifaith, secular, and political forms. Students will examine and evaluate both pacifist thought and peace activism. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 324  Legal Reasoning 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212. Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Pre-law Minor. Cross listed with Political Science and Law, JURI 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 330  Philosophy and Death 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. Seminar devoted to philosophical, mainly ethical and metaphysical, questions about death. 3 hours seminar.

PHIL 331  History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. The major philosophical systems and movements from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 333  History of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. The major philosophical systems and movements from the Renaissance to Kant. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 334  Theoretical and Applied Ethics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. Advanced seminar covering ethical theory and its application to post-modernism and other forms of relativism, the meaning of moral language and the possibility of religious and secular ethical foundations. 3 hours seminar.

PHIL 335  Nineteenth Century Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. A study of the major philosophical figures and movements of the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on Hegel and the Hegelian tradition. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 337  Analytic Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. The development of the analytic tradition in twentieth century philosophy; the logical and linguistic techniques employed. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 339  Contemporary Continental Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 202 or PHIL 208 or PHIL 231 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 264 or PHIL 266 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 271 or PHIL 280 or PHIL 288 or PHIL 290 or PHIL 295 or GLQS 201 or GSWS 301. This course surveys the four main movements of the continental (European) philosophical tradition: (1) 19th century German philosophy, (2) Marxism/critical theory, (3) phenomenology/existentialism, and (4) post-structuralism/postmodernism. This philosophical tradition runs from the 19th Century to the present day. Continental philosophy stands in contrast to the dominant, Anglo-American, "analytic" philosophical tradition. This course gives students the opportunity to examine the ways in which continental philosophers approach issues in the core subfields of philosophy, such as epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will also have the opportunity to explore similarities to and differences from the analytic philosophical tradition. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 376  Feminist Jurisprudence 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201. An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with JURI 376 and GSWS 376. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 390  Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 395  Periods and Movements: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 397  Periods and Movements: Selected Topics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours lecture.

PHIL 424  Seminar in Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, philosophers or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours seminar.

PHIL 426  Seminar in Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems philosopher, or works. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 hours seminar.

PHIL 444  Independent Study in Philosophy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Directed independent study and research in philosophy. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of philosophy. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits.

PHIL 446  Independent Study in Philosophy 3-12 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Directed independent study and research in philosophy. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of philosophy. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits.

PHIL 447  Independent Study in Philosophy 3-12 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Directed independent study and research in philosophy. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of philosophy. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits.

PHIL 449  Independent Study in Philosophy 3-12 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395. Directed independent study and research in philosophy. Open to students with a minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in at least 9 semester hours of philosophy. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits.