Family and Child Studies (FCST)

FCST 100  Professional Orientation 2 Credits


Orientation to the philosophy of the profession. Field experiences in a variety of settings to provide exposure to the breadth of professional opportunities. 2 hours lecture.

FCST 120  Mindfulness: Theory, Research and Practice across the Life Course 3 Credits


In this course, students study the practice of mindfulness for stress reduction. They practice and use mindfulness practice to reduce emotional distress and promote positive states of mind in their individual and family life, and work settings. Students examine current work in the fields of neuroscience, family and child studies, health, medicine, psychology, and education to further their understanding of how mindfulness impacts the brain functions across the life course. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 140  Family in Society 3 Credits


Students gain fundamental insight into and understanding of concepts from the social sciences. Students study the history and structure of the family as a basic but changing institution in modern America. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 141  Interpersonal Relations 3 Credits


Students learn about relevant and up-to-date information about meaningful human relationships throughout the life cycle. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 200  Introduction to Family Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): WRIT 105 or HONP 100 or PSYC 101. May be taken concurrently. Students examine families from historical, socio-cultural and theoretical perspectives, with a focus on the changes in American families over time and the implications of those changes for contemporary and future families. Students also examine issues that impact family development, structure and functions. Those issues include but are not limited to race, ethnicity, class, ablelism, age, gender and sexual orientation. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 201  Social Gerontology: The Study of Aging 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): WRIT 105 or HONP 100. In this course students examine issues related to aging in America from an individual and family perspective. They gain an understanding of biological, physiological, and cognitive changes related to aging and their impact upon families and daily life. Students also develop knowledge of the field of gerontology, utilizing a variety of perspectives including biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging and how personal values, attitudes, beliefs, race, ethnicity, and rituals affect the aging experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science Perspectives. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 205  Women in Contemporary Society 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 or WRIT 105 or HONP 100. Through this course students gain an understanding of how historical developments and social forces have shaped the status of women in America. Students engage in discussion about current concerns and role options available to today's women. Special attention is given to the construction of womanhood and the intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 210  Introduction to Child Life 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the profession of Child Life. Through this course students gain knowledge about the unique role of the Child Life Specialist in working with infants, children, adolescents and their families in the hospital and other health care settings. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 214  Child Development I 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 215  Infant Development 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and field experience required. Students in this class explore the infant as a developing individual within the family. Theory and research in the area of human infancy are applied throughout the course. Students gain knowledge about the physical, cognitive and emotional growth of infants from pre-natal through the first two years of life. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 216  Techniques for the Study of Child Personality 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214. Students practice observing and recording children's activities in order to develop skills needed to become more aware teachers. Students leave this class with skills and tools that enhance their understanding of the needs, motivations, competencies, and values of young children. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 217  Family Stress and Coping 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101. Families experience different types and levels of stress that could impact their daily functioning. Students will learn theories and conceptual frameworks of family stress in order to enhance their understanding of family stressors (e.g., positive and negative life transitions, economic stress, traumatic experiences, physical and mental illnesses, relationship problems within the family, violence, and substance abuse) and their effects on family life. Students will also examine theories and practice applications associated with healthy coping and crisis prevention. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 225  Exploring Family Diversity 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): WRIT 105 or HONP 100 or PSYC 101. Through this course students examine diversity in families with respect to designations such as race, ethnicity, religion, social class and sexual orientation. Students study diverse family formation, family roles, values and traditions, as well as the ways in which diverse families have impacted and been impacted by the United States culture and policy. Previous course FCST 440 effective through Spring 2011. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 230  Dynamics of One-To-One Communication 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 141. Through this course students examine the dynamics of one-to-one communication through readings and experientially through the development of personal goals for optimizing personal communication. Students also establish strategies for the attainment of these goals. Previous course FCST 330 effective through Winter 2012. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 231  The Family in the Economic System 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Students learn about the family as an economic unit in society. They explore the behavior of various sub-cultures, age groups, and family patterns and the impact these various attributes have upon families. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 240  Volunteer in the Community 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Fieldwork required. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students participate in a volunteer experience with a community agency. Through the course and volunteer experience, students explore socio-economic, civic, and educational problems facing individuals and families. Previous course FCST 301 effective through Fall 2014. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 241  Group Dynamics 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 141. This course presents an overview of the theory and practice of group dynamics, to prepare students to facilitate group processes to advance group- and individual-level objectives. This course examines developmental, ecological, and systems theories in terms of their implications for how individuals interact with and influence each other in group settings. This course reviews practical approaches and develops tools for working effectively with groups in a variety of family and/or child settings, both as a group member and as a group facilitator. Distinct approaches to group processes that are appropriate for specific developmental stages are emphasized (e.g., differences between group work with children, adolescents, and adults). 3 hours lecture.

FCST 270  Individual and Professional Development in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): GNED 100, GNED 199 and departmental approval. Students will have the opportunity to investigate professional and personal development strategies and apply them to their lives. Students will also explore influences on and blocks to their self management, including problem solving, professional planning, and decision making. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 275  Comparative Studies of Global Families 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): WRIT 105, PSYC 101 or HONP 101. In this course, students learn about similarities and differences among families in different cultures and countries by gathering, reviewing, and discussing various types of data and information. They engage in analytic and self-reflective review of dynamic family issues and practices in regard to mate selection and marriage; parenting; and aging and death. Their comparative, international research on families enhances their understanding of their own families' multicultural heritages and respect for families from different cultures, countries, and contexts. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 300  Field Trip Experiences in Family and Child Studies 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Students engage in the study of policies, problems and contributions of community organizations and agencies which relate to families and children.

FCST 304  Research Methods for Studying Families and Children 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200; and Family and Child Studies majors only. Through this introductory course students develop critical reading and analyzing skills regarding current research in the field of family and child studies. Students investigate various research approaches and the role of research in society and its relationships to conditions of power and oppression. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 305  Death and Bereavement in the Family 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Students examine human responses to the dying process across the lifespan as well as the social functions of grief and mourning. Students also explore perceptions of death in various social, cultural, and religious contexts as well as substantive and controversial topics related to the end of life. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 308  Independent Study 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental permission. Students engage in an independent study in advanced areas in Family and Child Studies not offered in the regular curriculum. Topics vary in response to student interests, faculty expertise, and current issues in the field. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different.

FCST 310  Teaching Daily Living Skills to Special Needs Populations 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students engage in analysis of daily personal management problems and their application to special needs populations. They also explore community resources, examine and develop materials and teaching strategies appropriate for teaching daily living skills to special needs populations. Previous course FCST 410 effective through Winter 2012. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 313  Organization and Management of Child Care Centers 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Students gain a basic understanding of principles of supervision and administration applied to developing a sound modern pre-school program. Students also learn about organization and administration of individual classrooms and the total school program as well as the relationships of the school with community services and agencies. Previous course FCST 414 effective through Winter 2012. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 314  Child Development II: Adolescence 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required. In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 315  Field Experiences in Family and Child Services 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and PSYC 101. Thirty-five hours of field work required. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students participate in a supervised field experience within selected agencies offering services for families and for children. Within the scope of this experience, students explore their own interest in the field of family and child services through a direct field experience and are exposed to the common professional roles and occupations. Students are expected to volunteer in a faculty-approved setting for 35 hours minimum during the semester. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 316  Service-Learning Experiences with Families and Children 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and PSYC 101. Thirty-five hours of field work required. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students engage in real-life service experience working on issues identified by the community organizations. By collaborating with community partners, students gain an understanding of civic engagement, diverse families, advocacy, program development, and the importance of reflection throughout the service experience. Students are required to provide three hours of weekly service with a community partner organization that works with families and/or children. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 317  Fieldwork Experience in Family and Child Studies: The Hospitalized Child 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 210. Experience for a minimum of 35 hours of field work in a pediatric setting approved by the instructor. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. This course is geared toward guiding and supporting prospective Child Life interns in their initial exposure to children, families, and staff in a pediatric hospital setting. Class meetings will be structured in a format that encourages class discussion and students will be expected to share experiences with the instructor and fellow peers. Students will have a planned supervised experience for a minimum of 35 hours of field work in a pediatric setting approved by the instructor. 3 hours field experience.

FCST 318  Gender Development Across the Life Course 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214. Students will explore various topics regarding gender development across the life course. For example, topics will include gender roles and attitudes, interaction of nature and nurture as well as limitations and expectations that our gender roles and attitudes place on us. The course will be delivered using a mix of topical and chronological approaches. Students will investigate classic and emerging research on gender development. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 320  Parenting Skills and Resources 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students have the opportunity to develop effective parenting skills and knowledge about human development needed for the application of these skills They also examine the impact of local, state, and national parenting resources on both parent and non-parents. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 322  Play Techniques in Working with Children 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. This hands-on course is designed to introduce students to the role and application of play in working with children in the fields of family services, social work, therapeutic recreation, education, and other related fields. Students examine the historical and cultural dimensions of play and explore major theories of play. Through lecture and experiential activities, students learn various play techniques used by practitioners, such as role-playing, expressive play, and storytelling. Students enhance their knowledge of the role of play in the treatment of children coping with short- and long-term family and life stressors, such as disabilities, illness, hospitalization, separation, divorce, trauma, and loss. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 325  Adult Development and Aging 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 or matriculation in the Gerontology minor and departmental approval. In this course students critically examine topics related to change and continuity in the psychological, emotional, and biological ways that adults develop in mid-life and later adulthood. Students analyze issues of mental health, stress and coping, personality development, changes in memory, learning, and cognitive functioning, as well as intelligence, creativity, and psychopathology in later life. They compare models of development throughout adulthood and consider cultural, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic variables that influence growth. Finally, students consider current research and contemporary issues as they pertain to adult development. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 328  Peer Counseling 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. This course provides the student with actual peer counseling experience. This experience takes the forms of one-to-one and group counseling. The student will experience the counseling process both as a counselor and as a client.

FCST 329  Theories and Techniques of Group Processes 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 241. Students develop understanding of how we function in groups of all sizes, with diverse populations and with various purposes throughout life. Students gain an understanding of the underlying dynamics of groups and receive the opportunity to relate the theories of group development to the actual group process. Students explore theories and techniques useful in the positive development of entelchy groups.

FCST 331  Money Management 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students explore the role and meaning of money in individual and family living and understanding income as a means of acquiring a style of life. They also examine the effective control of income, spending, savings, credit, and how to manage resources for future needs. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 332  Action Approaches to Personal Awareness 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Students work towards developing awareness and skills needed to maximize individual growth in human interaction. Through the use of psychodrama and other action-oriented techniques, students have the opportunity to experience, critically evaluate and develop strategies for working through communication barriers to a more effective interaction for their personal benefit and the benefit of others.

FCST 340  Aging and Social Policy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200; or matriculation in Gerontolgy minor and departmental approval. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Recognizing the importance of public policy as it pertains to a growing, aging population, this course will introduce students to a range of policy issues at the federal, state, and local levels. The process of policy formation will be reviewed including how political organizations, special-interest groups, and advisory groups influence policy development and implementation. The course will cover the major public programs for older adults in the U.S. that address income security, health and long-term care, and housing needs. In order to recognize the varying effects policy can have on the lives of seniors, older adults from diverse socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds will be considered. Because families often struggle with the demands of caregiving and long-term care assistance, an evaluation of national and international public policy initiatives designed to address those needs will be conducted. Finally, students will be encouraged to identify and explore contemporary public policy issues that affect older adults on a regular basis. 3.0 hours lecture.

FCST 342  Family Sociology 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Not open to freshmen. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students learn to identify and interpret data and research relating to families and examine the interplay between family relations at the micro level and social forces at the macro level. The course will also explore the effect of social and demographic change on American families. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 344  Challenge of Aging 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 201. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Students examine how changes over the adult life span affect family interaction and resources in various cultural groups within the United States. Students also engage in fieldwork with agencies and elders and learn about the implications of social policy and institutions relative to an increasing aging population. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 345  Gender in a Changing World 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Gender issues that exist in our society and cross-culturally. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 348  Individual and Family Development Over the Life Course 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. This course provides an overview of family development over the life course in the United States and in other societies. Students explore concepts and theories related to transitions within families over the life course. This course also emphasizes the role of culture and diversity in the development and functioning of families.

FCST 350  Immigrant Families 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. This course is focused on contemporary immigrant families in the United States. The purpose is to critically examine immigrant family dynamics across generations, using classic and new acculturation theories and in the context of global migration and transnationalism. Students explore multiple topics related to immigrant families (e.g., family adaptation, changes in parent-child relationships, heritage language maintenance and loss, youth's ethnic identity development, education, intergenerational relationships, interactions with social institutions). Students analyze how such factors as ethnicity, gender, class, migration goals, legal status, human capital, country of origin, and areas of settlement shape the experiences of immigrant families. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 360  Families in Later Life 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 or PSYC 101. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Applying the fields of family science and gerontology, students learn about family relationships, roles, and responsibilities in the second half of life. Students engage in discussion about later life families and the sociological and demographic implications of these families. Culturally and ethnically diverse populations are considered as well as issues of social justice. Multiple substantive topics related to aging families are examined (i.e., care giving, grandparenting, marriage and sibling relationships later life, housing, retirement, widowhood, aging parent-adult child relations, etc.). 3 hours lecture.

FCST 370  Individual and Family Problem-Solving 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students gain insight to how to deal with daily living through increased competence in decision-making and problem solving in a variety of life styles. Students develop skills for managing individual and family needs, problem solving, setting goals, and playing a leadership role. Students also examine ways in which the planned change process can be used at the individual or family level with a focus on strengths as well as problems. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 400  Senior Seminar 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Family and Child Studies major and departmental approval. Corequisite(s): FCST 409. A capstone course which explores the integrative nature of the study of families and children and investigates the roles, conflicts and decision-making perspectives for beginning professionals. 3 hours seminar.

FCST 401  Advanced Research Methods in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 304 and departmental approval. Through this advanced class in research methods students have the opportunity to plan and execute individual research thesis and projects, drawing on their earlier research course. Students continue to explore the research process as initiators of research projects, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students are encouraged to present their completed research in professional forums. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 408  Workshop in Family and Child Studies 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and any 300-level FCST course or departmental approval. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. This selected topics workshop invites students and professors to critically examine, discuss, and analyze current research on issues of concern in the field of Family and Child Studies. Topics are determined prior to course offering and publicized. The course may be repeated five times for a maximum of fifteen semester hours, provided the topic is different.

FCST 409  Internship 6-12 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Family and Child Studies major and departmental approval. Corequisite(s): FCST 400. Students have the opportunity to work as an intern in a professional setting in a community organization, agency, or a service organization. The internship experience is the final step in a student's education as a Family and Child Studies student at Montclair State University (MSU). The placement experience aims to give students on-the-job training in a setting that provides contact with people in various program related environments. This is an opportunity for students to further enhance career preparation by developing professional competencies in such areas as critical thinking, assessment techniques, problem solving behaviors, decision making processes, utilization of resources, ability to function as part of a diverse work force, and understanding of the general operation, management, and philosophies of social service agencies. Students are expected to undertake a serious professional responsibility and work with diverse client populations to better understand the roles, rights, and responsibilities of consumers who utilize social services.

FCST 411  Sibling Relationships 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. In this course, students study sibling relationships and how they shape human development. They use family systems theory, sibling development principles and other frameworks to examine human behavior. They consider sibling behavior within the context of society, and give attention to the role of social location in the lives of families and children. Areas of sibling behavior explored include rivalry, support, birth order, selection of interests, personality and identity development, and abuse. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 415  Child in the Community 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 214 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students gain knowledge about the attitudes, mores and values of family and neighborhood life as a determinant of the child's adaptation to school. They examine the impact on children of growing up in different types of families and in different types of social settings. They learn about the different types of specialists and agencies in the community. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 418  Working with Diverse Families and Children 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 315 or FCST 316. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Students study different approaches to working with diverse families and children in human service, community, and educational settings. A particular focus is on skill development for facilitating and leading family conferences in a variety of professional settings. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 419  Special Studies in Family and Child Services 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department or departmental approval. Students utilize an ecological lens to critically examine social problems impacting youth and their families in the 21st century. Issues include substance abuse, school violence, gang involvement, teen pregnancy, and HIV/AIDS. Students leave with an understanding of various prevention-related initiatives with proven effectiveness and how they can serve to protect youth and their families. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 430  Evidence-Based Family Policy and Analysis 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and FCST 304 and an additional 6 credits from the Family and Child Studies core. Students will use research evidence to examine historical and contemporary family policies from a social justice perspective. Students will use various research and policy analysis strategies to analyze family policies, including future family policy needs. Additionally, students will learn how to use advocacy to support and strengthen family policies to meet the needs of diverse families across the life course. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 445  Poverty and Families 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 304. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students examine the impact of economic structures, social conditions, gender, race and ethnicity as they affect the family system as well as various social factors that place families at risk including family structures and community conditions such as poverty, access to resources, and geographic locations. Community contact is a requirement of the course. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Family and Child Studies. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 448  Family Counseling 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 141 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department. This introductory counseling-based course focuses on the core concepts fundamental to an understanding of marital and family therapy. Students learn about typical family functioning and atypical family dysfunction as well as strategies employed by practicing family therapists. The course emphasizes a multi-cultural approach to family counseling. Students review current research on family process and treatment. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 470  Family Management 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 200 and FCST 348. Restricted to majors within the Family Science and Human Development department. Students examine the many factors that influence and are influenced by the ways families use resources to maintain daily life and solve problems. They analyze different situations, considering such factors as the roles played by different family members, the goals of different family members in different situations, decision making, the use of human and nonhuman resources, and other factors influencing household management. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 501  Seminar in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


In this course students gain experience identifying issues in family and child studies and analyzing trends as a basis for managing change. Each student designs and plans for implementation of a project. 3 hours seminar.

FCST 503  Program Development in Family Life Education 3 Credits


Students analyze current problems, practices, trends, and the development of family living programs. Students also plan and design an innovative program for implementation. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 505  Death in a Family Context 3 Credits


Students will study death and dying from multidisciplinary perspective. Students will examine human responses to the dying process across the life span as well as the social functions of grief and mourning. Perceptions of death in various social, cultural, and religious contexts will be explored as will substantive topics relating to attitudes towards death, hospice, physician assisted suicide, end of life planning, and current policy and ethical issues related to the end of life. This course will be of interest for anyone who works with dying people and their families or students who want to find out more about death, dying and bereavement. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 506  Introductory Statistical Methods in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


This course provides students with an overview of basic statistics used in family and child studies taking an applied approach. Students develop a conceptual understanding of the methods used in data analysis. They learn about descriptive statistics, normal distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests, correlation, simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Students are also introduced to several advanced statistical methods such as factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 507  Research in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Designed to provide basic research and statistical literacy so that the student can develop a research proposal in its entirety in family and child studies. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 508  Independent Study in Family and Child Studies 1-3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. In this independent study students have the opportunity to study in-depth areas of family and child studies which are not offered in the regular curriculum. Topics vary in response to student interests, faculty expertise, and current issues in the field.

FCST 509  Research Seminar 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 507. Students will develop critical thinking skills as applied to original research and theoretical writing. This course is designed to facilitate the development of ideas and concepts that will be used by students to execute their master's thesis. 3 hours seminar.

FCST 510  Qualitative Methods in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 507 or departmental approval. In this course students develop introductory skills for conducting basic and applied qualitative research within the family and child studies discipline. Particular emphasis is on the connections between choice of theory, methodological approach, elements of research design, and analysis strategy. Students also develop skills related to the ethical practice of qualitative research, strategies to enhance validity, and rapport building with research participants. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 512  Child Development I: Theories of Child Development 3 Credits


In this course students examine and critique the standard theories of so-called "normative" child development along with newer contextual models that consider the role of oppressive structures in the lives of children. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 513  Child Development II: Unique Perspective 3 Credits


Students engage in an in-depth examination of a selected topic in child development. The course content is determined by the Department of Family Science and Human Development faculty. Students examine and critique recent and emerging knowledge with the aim of developing a sophisticated understanding of children's lives from a unique perspective. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 514  Child in the Family 3 Credits


In this course, students engage in an intensive study of the theories and research related to child rearing techniques. Students also analyze of factors influencing parental practices and their effects on the child. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 515  Child Development II: Adolescence 3 Credits


Students utilize developmental and ecological approaches to study physical, cognitive, and social development of adolescents (11-18 years) in terms of change within and differences between individuals. Students also examine how family, peer, neighborhood, sociocultural factors, and politics can have an influence on adolescents. The roles of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status in adolescent development are likewise examined. Students also engage in out-of-class observations and/or interview projects as well as develop an APA style research literature review or proposal paper. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 516  Human Development 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing. In this course, students learn about theories and current knowledge of human development throughout the lifespan (from conception through death). Drawing on lifespan and life course perspectives, students critically examine various issues and topics related to social, emotional, cognitive, psychological, and biological change with an emphasis on the diversity of humans. The role of cultural context in shaping the course of human development is emphasized. Students explore topics related to both typical and atypical development, as well as research methods for assessing developmental change. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 518  Families, Communities, and Schools: Diversity, Culture, and Democracy 3 Credits


Students gain an understanding of how social and cultural influences shape children's development and learning. Students also explore how relationships among teacher, parent, children and community can affect learning and discuss how to develop school and family partnerships. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity and culturally responsive teaching as they create learning experiences. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 530  Consumer Behavior 3 Credits


In this course students investigate consumer behavior from the consumer's perspective. Students also analyze how individual perception, motivation, learning, and personality as well as family organization, social class, subcultures and national economic trends can have an effect upon consumers. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 535  Consumer and Family Law 3 Credits


Students examine how the laws and policies of different institutions can affect family functions, relationships, and welfare. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 540  Interdisciplinary Study of Family 3 Credits


Students gain an understanding of how various academic disciplines (history, anthropology, biology, economics, as well as psychology and sociology) contribute towards a more comprehensive understanding of family life. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 542  Dynamics of Family Interaction 3 Credits


Students engage in a critical review of current concepts and theories, both psychological and sociological, and how they are used in understanding patterns and problems of family relationships. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 544  Intercultural Study of Family 3 Credits


In this course students perform an analytical study of cross cultural regularities and differentials in family structures, while examining functions and impact of social change on family values and patterns. Students utilize a variety of conceptual approaches to the study of families as well as gain a broad acquaintance with empirical studies and research. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 550  Fieldwork in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Through this course students have the opportunity to develop and enhance their professional knowledge and skills under the mentorship of experienced professionals and faculty. Students use fieldwork as a chance to link and integrate theory, research, and practice. Students gain first-hand experience in a setting congruent with their area of interest and possible future employment. Settings can include but are not limited to agencies, government offices, schools, grant funded projects, and faculty or institutional research endeavors. Decisions about the type of location of field work are made in consultation with the student's advisor. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours field experience.

FCST 560  Housing the Family 3 Credits


Analysis of location, structure, design, furnishings and equipment as a setting for the physical and emotional development of the individual and the family. Graduate status required. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 570  Management of Family Resources 3 Credits


Students examine the family as a decision-making unit and how to direct resources for more effective living. Students also analyze how philosophical, psychological, sociological and economic trends have a direct influence on the family's ability to maximize its resource potential and utilization. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 571  Problem-Solving in Family Counseling 3 Credits


Students gain an understanding of how to counsel families in problem solving on resource use, including the resources of time, energy, attitudes and material as well as non-material goods and services. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 572  Management Seminar 3 Credits


Students apply personal management concepts to their professional role with the goal of developing more effective ways of handling professional situations and responsibilities. 3 hours seminar.

FCST 590  Selected Topics in Family and Child Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. In this course students engage in an in-depth and interdisciplinary study of a current selected topic, issue, or trend. Topics are announced in the course schedule book. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 620  Social Policy and the Family 3 Credits


Through this course students gain a historical overview of family policy in the United States and the role of the economy, politics, race, class, gender, and legal and advocacy issues. Students examine major social policies and programs and how they affect diverse families' well-being and quality of life across the life course. Through a social justice lens, students analyze intended and unintended family consequences of governmental policies as well as the policy implications of change in the structures and composition of families. Students also learn the basics of policy formation and the competing constituencies that help shape the process. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 640  Family Theories 3 Credits


Students gain an overview of the interface between theory, research, and application of various developmental and behavioral theories related to the study of families and interpersonal relationships. Students engage in an extensive and in-depth review and analysis of the major theoretical frameworks underlying the understanding of family functioning and development. Students also analyze current research on diverse families through varying theoretical lenses. They analysis emphasizes the influence of gender, age, ethnicity, disability, religion, language, immigration, cultural values and beliefs, education, social class, and sexual orientation on the development, understanding and application of family theories. 3 lecture hours.

FCST 697  Master's Project 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): FCST 509. In this course, students will develop and implement a project as part of the culminating experience of their course of study leading to the MA degree in Family and Child Studies. Students will use the skills that they have acquired in their previous coursework and will select a topic for further inquiry based on their professional goals. Each student is required to develop a tangible product such as position paper, journal article, action research investigation, instructional videotape/CD ROM, review of curriculum, policy manual, etc. A formal written report of the completed project is to be submitted. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 698  Master's Thesis 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Students develop an Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School.

FCST 699  Master's Thesis Extension 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): FCST 698. This thesis extension will be graded as IP (In Progress) until a student completes his/her thesis, at which time a grade of Pass or Fail will be given.

FCST 750  Partnering, Cohabitation, and Marriage 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into a graduate or doctoral program. In this seminar course students develop a critical understanding of the processes adults use to partner and maintain their relationships, including cohabiting and marriage. Students use multiple theoretical approaches to analyze how these processes are influenced by contextual factors, vary by demographic characteristics, and are related to factors associated with individual and couple well-being. Students critically analyze a self-selected problem area related to couple relationships related to their potential dissertation interests. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 751  Divorce, Remarriage, and Stepfamilies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into a graduate or doctoral program. In this seminar course students develop a critical understanding of the transitions related to divorce, remarriage, and stepfamily functioning with a strong emphasis on factors that promote adjustment and well-being. Students use multiple theoretical approaches to analyze how these transitions are influenced by contextual factors, vary by demographic characteristics, and are related to factors associated with individual and couple well-being. Students critically analyze a self-selected problem area related to these family transitions based on their potential dissertation interests. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 801  Concepts and Theories of Human Development 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into a graduate or doctoral program. Students critically analyze major theories and concepts of human development throughout the lifespan. Students also critically analyze the application of these theories and concepts in contemporary research on human development. The connections between theory and methodology are stressed. In this course, we examine and discuss the historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of developmental science. The course stresses relational developmental systems models of development which are at the forefront of our current understanding of human development. These models provide the theoretical grounding for the role that developmental science plays in enhancing positive development across the life span through applications that include community-based programs and social policies. The idea that developmental science, when framed by relational developmental systems models, should contribute to the promotion of social justice and liberty, is also discussed. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 820  Critical Change and Advocacy in Family Studies 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Family Studies PhD program. This course provides students with an overview of theory, research, and practice in prevention and intervention science and engages them in exploring factors that promote positive change processes in family life. Students are encouraged to examine factors that promote or inhibit healthy development; to apply empirically-based knowledge towards mitigating emotional, behavioral, academic, and social problems; and to promote healthy family development. They explore selected family health, behavior, and social problem areas (e.g., substance abuse, teen pregnancy, youth violence, gerontological sexual risk), depending on their potential dissertation interests. They examine grant funding processes related to prevention and intervention, including the identification of funding opportunities, application procedures, implementation, and evaluation strategies. Students are encouraged to view themselves as agents of change and to actively engage in formulating change models, exploring funding opportunities, and evaluating advocacy approaches. Students also examine the role of context and larger societal structures, such as power and oppression, in family functioning, change processes and advocacy. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 821  Seminar in Family Policy 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Family Studies PhD program. This course is designed as the culmination of graduate studies in family policy. In this course, students critically examine issues of power, privilege, and competing political agendas as they are woven through the policy process, focusing on how historical and ideological debates shape current and future policy creation and implementation. Students extend their ability to critically examine and utilize theories, data, and research on family policy via a close analysis of an issue in their area of interest. They apply their understanding of family policy studies to their area of research cal policies, focusing specifically on how past political and historical contexts shape current iterations of policy and on who benefits from the proposed initiatives and current policies and who is placed at risk. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 831  Selected Topics in Family Studies 1-3 Credits


Advanced theoretical and practice-oriented, in-depth study of an aspect of Family Studies, or the professoriate in Family Studies. Topics will be determined prior to course offering and publicized. May be repeated once for a maximum of six semester hours as a three hour offering; may be repeated twice for a maximum of three credits, if it is offered as a one-credit seminar, as long as topic is different. 1 hour lecture.

FCST 842  Critique of Family Processes 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Family Studies PhD Program. This course examines the theoretical frameworks and provides students with an advanced understanding of family processes. While family systems theory provides the central focus, students consider and critique a variety of epistemological stances, including feminist, resiliency, and multicultural epistemologies. Through the lenses of theory, research and knowledge from practice, student explore the inner workings of family relationships, how various experiences interact with family and child experiences, and how contextual factors influence family relationships. Students have the opportunity to tailor their coursework inquiry into family processes to reflect their dissertation research focus. 3 credits lecture.

FCST 844  Power and the Intersectionality of Social Locations 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Family Studies PhD program. In this course, students explore how individuals experience, organize and negotiate their membership in the full range of social categories to which they belong. Individuals have multiple, layered identities that are derived from social relations, history and the operation of structures of power; the intersection of these identities allows for the simultaneous experiences of oppression and privilege. In the course, students explore intersection theory, which holds that modes of inequality based on factors such as race, class and gender can combine in ways that may do violence to individuals and families through institutional and systematic practices antithetical to their well-being. Using this theoretical lens, students explore patterns of inequality based on these interconnecting systems of advantage and disadvantage, which are dependent on the particular social positioning of individuals and families. 3 credits lecture.

FCST 850  Advanced Practicum 3 Credits


Prerequisite(s): EDFD 820 and EDFD 821; and EDFD 823 or EDFD 822. The advanced practicum experience is designed to enhance students' professional skills and development by directly linking and integrating theory and practice. Students can round out their experiences in the doctoral program and add professional dimensions they wish to further develop. Toward that end, they have considerable latitude to design and carry out an experience that directly meets their needs professionally. Students, mentors, and university faculty work closely in the design and implementation of a practicum experience that furthers the professional goals of the student. Experiences could include, but are not limited to, a combination of applied research/policy work, service/community outreach, teaching experiences, and administrative internships. Decisions about the type and location of the practicum are made in consultation with the student's advisor and must be approved by the doctoral program director. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 898  Dissertation Seminar 3 Credits


This seminar is designed as a workshop that provides a supportive, focused, yet critical space for doctoral students to conceptualize and write a research proposal to be used as the basis for their dissertations. Much of the work is "hands on" in that students bring drafts of various components of the proposal to class, critique and provide feedback on each other' s work, and present their ongoing work to the class as a whole. Students receive feedback from seminar classmates and the instructor to refine and finalize their plans for their proposed research. Students read purposefully in areas related to their proposed research methodologies as well as for their literature reviews. 3 hours lecture.

FCST 900  Dissertation Advisement 3-12 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in the Ph.D. in Family Studies Program; Advancement to Candidacy. This department requires 12 credits of FCST 900. While enrolled in FCST 900, students will work with their Dissertation Chair and their Dissertation Committee. Credits are reported as IP (In Progress) while the dissertation is being written. At the conclusion of the dissertation defense, a final grade of Pass or Fail will be recorded.

FCST 901  Dissertation Extension 1 Credit


Prerequisite(s): 12 credits of Dissertation Advisement. Once students have acquired 12 credits of FCST 900 Dissertation Advisement, they must enroll in 1 credit of FCST 901 in every semester in which they intend to work on the dissertation, up to and including the semester of the defense. Credits are reported as IP (In Progress) while the dissertation is being written. At the conclusion of the dissertation defense, a final grade of pass or fail will be recorded. FCST 901 may be repeated until the time limitation for completion of the doctoral program as specified in the Doctoral Policy Manual has been reached.

FCST 920  Qualifying Examination Preparation 0.5 Credits


Prerequisite(s): Students with PhD in Family Studies only. Special fee.